Blog Index
The journal that this archive was targeting has been deleted. Please update your configuration.
Navigation

Co-Parenting 101

Helping Your Kids Thrive In Two Households After Divorce

A successful co-parenting relationship with your ex is as vital to your child's well-being and health as nutritious food or proper exercise. Psychological studies and plain common sense both point to the fact that children are happier, healthier, and better adjusted when both of their parents play active roles in their lives. Simply put, co-parenting is a must, not an option, and it is an important key to raising children who will thrive.

In Co-parenting 101, the authors share their own experiences raising children together after their divorce, and at the same time provide sound professional advice from co-parenting experts. With practical tips and powerful co-parenting strategies, this book will help you create a functional and positive relationship with your ex so that you can both be more fully present and engaged with your children as they grow.

Our book is now available for order!
Click on any of the following stores to buy Co-Parenting 101:

 

This formerly married couple not only co-parent their children without rancor, but in Co-parenting 101, they teach us how to do it, too. What a helpful, detailed, and realistic guide to a widespread but much ignored situation! This book will help readers navigate the tricky and often treacherous waters of co-parenting with a former partner.

— Ericka Lutz, author of The Complete Idiot's Guide to Stepparenting

As a family physician, I care for hundreds of families with parents living separately. The mental and physical health of children is directly impacted by the relationship between their co-parents. I'm recommending this book to every separated family I see. If parents were willing to step up and consider the suggestions made in Co-parenting 101, their kids would be healthier and far more resilient!

— Deborah Gilboa, MD, askdoctorg.com

An extraordinary book and required reading for separated and divorced parents, as well as mental health practitioners. [Co-parenting 101] outlines some of the possible pitfalls of the co-parenting process with which clinicians like myself are all too familiar and regularly deal with therapeutically. But now we can refer parents to Co-parenting 101 to help them mindfully approach the co-parenting process and examine the array of options they have in their parenting toolbox.

— Robert F. Fierstein, PhD, licensed psychologist